International adoption dries up

International adoption dries up

Changing economics, laws mean demand far exceeds supply

The Baltimore Sun, 11:24 a.m. EST, November 12, 2012

Until about 1950, a married American couple wanting to have a child other than by procreation had only two options: adopt a U.S.-born children privately (e.g. attorneys, private child welfare agencies) or through public social welfare agencies. The model of adoption, dominant for many decades, was locked into the idea that racially matching potential parents with available children would be the best — and just about only — way to ensure an adoption’s success.

At the end of the Korean War, American and other Western couples seeking to adopt were given a third option. Thousands of adoptable infants and toddlers from South Korea became available. Between 1953-1962, 15,000 Korean-born children were adopted by U.S. families. By 1976, that number doubled to 30,000 children. Thousands of others were adopted by West European families.

The idea of racially matching a child to parents almost ended, with what today is known as inter-country adoption. What remained entrenched until very recently was that single adults (both gay and straight), same-sex partners and nonwhites (except Asians) were not acceptable candidates as adoptive families for these Korean infants.

Throughout history, except when it was defined as a means of joining families and/or lands, adoption has been a within-country social class exchange, with the rich adopting the children of the poor. Inter-country adoption adds to this exchange the components of geography, ethnicity and race. Almost by definition, therefore, inter-country adoption has never been without controversy. This type of adoption was, early on, frequently labeled imperialistic, colonialist, racist and genocidal — charges that continue to this day.

Yet, for about 20 years beginning in 1980, the supply of foreign-born children into the U.S. and Western Europe was essentially stable, if not predictable. Korea, GuatemalaRussia and China could be counted upon to provide U.S. families with many thousands of their children each year. Many were under age 3, the most desirable category of adoptee. However, for almost a decade, there has been a steady decline in these numbers. From 2004-2011, the U.S. experienced a 40 percent decline in the number of international adoptions. From thousands of children a year sent from China, Russia, Korea and Guatemala, adoptions fell to hundreds and in some cases fewer than 100 per country. All indicators suggest that this decline will continue. In 2002, some 20,000 foreign-born children were adopted by U.S. families. In 2010, that number was 11,000.

The reason is not lack of demand. Sending countries are responding to domestic forces, such as a higher standard of living allowing them to care for their own; greater emphasis on encouraging domestic adoption with legislation enacted to stimulate this; and reaction to a number of negative episodes involving adoptive families in the U.S. who were either accused of abusing their adopted children or simply “returning” them to their birth countries.

Read the full article here.

 

 
 
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